人生を考えるメッセージ。英語の勉強にもなる。Jobs伝説のスピーチ

何かに迷ったら、jobsのスピーチを聞いてみよう。
大学生はこのスピーチを聞いてみよう。
英語に自身がある人は訳を見なくても大丈夫ですね。
15分間彼のスピーチに浸って欲しい。
Thank you. ありがとう。
I’m honored to be with you today for your commencement from one of the finest universities in the world.
世界でも有数の大学の卒業式に同席でき、とても光栄に思います。
Truth be told, I never graduated from college, and this is the closest I’ve ever gotten to a college graduation.
実は私は大学を出ていないので、これが最も卒業式に近い体験となります。
Today, I want to tell you three stories from my life. That’s it. No big deal. Just three stories. 
本日は、私の人生における3つのストーリーをお話します。それだけです。たったの3つのストーリーです。
The first story is about connecting the dots.
1つめの話は、『点をつなげる』という話。 
I dropped out of Reed College after the first six months, but then stayed around as a drop-in for another 18 months or so before I really quit.
私はReed大学を半年で退学したのですが、その後18ヶ月は引き続き、授業を聴講していました。
 
So why did I drop out? 
では、何故やめたのか?
It started before I was born.
それは、私が生まれる前にさかのぼります。 
My biological mother was a young, unwed graduate student, and she decided to put me up for adoption.
私の生みの母は、若い未婚の大学院生で、私を養子に出すことに決めました。
She felt very strongly that I should be adopted by college graduates, so everything was all set for me to be adopted at birth by a lawyer and his wife – except that when I popped out they decided at the last minute that they really wanted a girl.
母のたっての強い希望は、私を大学卒の学歴を持つ人へ養子に出すことだったので、弁護士夫婦に私が生まれたらすぐに養子に出されることが約束されていたのです。ただ、私が産声をあげたその時になって、彼らは男の子ではなく女の子が欲しいと気が変わっていたことは別として…。
So my parents, who were on a waiting list, got a call in the middle of the night asking, “We’ve got an unexpected baby boy; do you want him?” They said, “Of course.”
そこで、ある夜中のことウェイティング・リストに名前の入っていた私の両親に電話があったのです。「予期せぬ男の赤ちゃんを得たのですが、あなたがたは受け入れたいですか?」 「もちろんです!」
My biological mother found out later that my mother had never graduated from college and that my father had never graduated from high school. She refused to sign the final adoption papers.
私の産みの母は後に、私の育ての母は大学を出ておらず、父にいたっては高校さえ卒業していないと知り、養子縁組の最終書類にサインをすることを拒みました。
She only relented a few months later when my parents promised that I would go to college. This was the start in my life. 
育ての両親が私を大学にやることを約束したことで、産みの母は数ヵ月後にようやく折れ、ここから私の人生はスタートしたのです。
And 17 years later I did go to college.
17年後、私は大学に入学しました。
But I naively chose a college that was almost as expensive as Stanford, and all of my working-class parents’ savings were being spent on my college tuition.
しかし私は考えもなく、Stanford 大学と同じくらい学費の高い大学を選んだのです。労働者階級の私の両親の貯金は、学費に消えていきました。
After six months, I couldn’t see the value in it. I had no idea what I wanted to do with my life and no idea how college was going to help me figure it out.
だいたい6ヵ月後には、私は大学に価値を見出せなくなっており、自分が人生で何をしたいのか、そして大学がその助けになるのかということがわからなくなっていたのです。
And here I was spending all of the money my parents had saved their entire life. 
それなのに、私は両親が生涯をかけて貯めたお金を浪費しているのです。
So I decided to drop out and trust that it would all work out okay.
そこで、私は大学を辞め、これですべてがうまくいくと信じたのです。
It was pretty scary at the time, but looking back it was one of the best decisions I ever made.
その時は非常に怖かったけれど、今振り返ると自分の決断の中でもベストな決断だったと思います。
The minute I dropped out I could stop taking the required classes that didn’t interest me, and begin dropping in on the ones that looked far more interesting. 
大学を辞めたと同時に、履修していたつまらない必修科目をやめ、聴講生としてはるかに興味深い他の授業に出席しはじめました。
It wasn’t all romantic.
全てが夢のようではありませんでした。
I didn’t have a dorm room, so I slept on the floor in friends’ rooms.
私は寮に自分の部屋がなかったので、友達の部屋の床で寝ていました。
I returned coke bottles for the five cent deposits to buy food with, and I would walk the seven miles across town every Sunday night to get one good meal a week at the Hare Krishna temple.
コーラのボトルをリサイクルで返却し、手に入れた5セントは、食べ物を買うための足しにしていました。 毎週日曜日の夜は、週に1度のよい食事にありつくために、クシュリナ教の寺院まで町をぬけて7マイルも歩いたものでした。
I loved it.
この生活がとても好きでした。
And much of what I stumbled into by following my curiosity and intuition turned out to be priceless later on. 
自分の興味や直感にしたがって出会う数々のものが、のちにお金では買えない価値のあるものとなったのです。
Let me give you one example:
ひとつ例を紹介させてください。
Reed College at that time offered perhaps the best calligraphy instruction in the country.
当時のReed大学では、国内でも最高水準のカリグラフィ(装飾文字)のクラスがありました。
Throughout the campus every poster, every label on every drawer, was beautifully hand calligraphed.
キャンパス内のあらゆるポスター、戸棚のラベルにいたるまで、すべて美しい飾り文字で彩られていたのです。
Because I had dropped out and didn’t have to take the normal classes, I decided to take a calligraphy class to learn how to do this.
私は退学し、特に受けなければいけないクラスもない身でしたので、このカリグラフィの授業に出席し、手法を学び始めました。
I learned about serif and san serif typefaces, about varying the amount of space between different letter combinations, about what makes great typography great.
serifやsan serifの書体、活字の組み合わせで文字間のスペースを変える事や、どうしたら活字がより美しくなるかを学びました。
It was beautiful, historical, artistically subtle in a way that science can’t capture, and I found it fascinating.
それは美しく、歴史的で、科学では説明することのできない微妙な芸術性に富んだもので、私にとって実に魅惑的だったのです。
None of this had even a hope of any practical application in my life.
これらのことは1つとして、私の人生の中で実用的な応用がきくとは思っていませんでした。
But ten years later, when we were designing the first Macintosh computer, it all came back to me.
しかし10年後、我々が最初のマッキントッシュコンピュータをデザインした時、それが全て私によみがえってきました。
And we designed it all into the Mac.
そして、その全てをマックの中に組み込んだのです。
It was the first computer with beautiful typography.
それは美しい活字をもった初めてのコンピュータとなりました。
If I had never dropped in on that single course in college, the “Mac” would have never had multiple typefaces or proportionally spaced fonts.
もし私があの授業を聴講していなかったら、「Mac」には複数書体が入っておらず、もしくは字間調整フォントもなかったことでしょう。
And since Windows just copied the Mac, it’s likely that no personal computer would have them.
ウインドウズは単にMacをコピーしただけですので、(Macがこうでなければ)このようなパソコンは生まれなかったことでしょう。
If I had never dropped out, I would have never dropped in on that calligraphy class, and personal computers might not have the wonderful typography that they do.
もしも私が大学を退学しなかったら、そしてカリグラフィの授業に出席をしていなかったら、パソコンは今のようにすばらしい活字をもっていなかったことでしょう。
Of course it was impossible to connect the dots looking forward when I was in college. But it was very, very clear looking backwards 10 years later.
もちろん、大学にいた頃は先を見て点と点を結ぶことは不可能でしたが、10年後、さかのぼって振り返ると、それは非常にはっきりしています。
Again, you can’t connect the dots looking forward; you can only connect them looking backwards.
繰り返して言うと、先を見越して「点」と「点」をつなげることは不可能であり、過去を振り返った時にのみ可能です。
So you have to trust that the dots will somehow connect in your future.
つまり、将来的に「点」と「点」がつながると信じなければいけないのです。
You have to trust in something – your gut, destiny, life, karma, whatever – because believing that the dots will connect down the road will give you the confidence to follow your heart, even when it leads you off the well-worn path, and that will make all the difference. 
あなたの根性、運命、人生、宿命、何であろうと、それを信じることが必要です。なぜなら、点同士がつながることを信じる事が、みんなが歩いてきた道から脱線をする結果になったとしても、そうすることが全てをかなえる重要なことになるからです。
My second story is about love and loss.
2つ目の話は、愛と喪失についてです。
I was lucky – I found what I loved to do early in life.
私は幸運にも、人生の早い段階で自分がやりたいことを見つけました。
Woz and I started Apple in my parents’ garage when I was 20.
Wozと私が20歳のとき、私の両親宅のガレージでAppleをスタートしました。 
We worked hard, and in 10 years Apple had grown from just the two of us in a garage into a two billion dollar company with over 4000 employees.
私たちは一生懸命働き、わずか2人で始めた会社が、10年後には4,000人以上の従業員を抱える20億ドル企業にまで成長したのです。
We’d just released our finest creation – the Macintosh – a year earlier, and I had just turned 30.
我々はそのちょうど1年前、最高の創造物であるMacintoshをリリースしました。私が30歳になった時のことでした。
And then I got fired.
そして私は会社をクビになりました。
How can you get fired from a company you started?
自分が始めた会社をどうやったらクビになるかですって?
Well, as Apple grew we hired someone who I thought was very talented to run the company with me, and for the first year or so things went well.
ええ。会社が成長するにつれ、私は自分と共に会社を動かしていく、才能ある人を雇いました。初めのうちはそれでうまくいっていたのです。
But then our visions of the future began to diverge and eventually we had a falling out.
しかし、将来のビジョンがだんだん枝分かれし始め、最終的に我々は決裂をしたのです。
When we did, our Board of Directors sided with him.
その時、取締役会は彼の側に立ちました。
And so at 30, I was out.
こうして、私は30歳で失業したのです。
And very publicly out.
これは世間でも広く知られました。
What had been the focus of my entire adult life was gone, and it was devastating.
自分が人生をかけてやってきたことが崩壊し、破滅したのです。
I really didn’t know what to do for a few months.
数ヶ月の間、何をしていいのかわかりませんでした。
I felt that I had let the previous generation of entrepreneurs down – that I had dropped the baton as it was being passed to me.
私は、自分に渡されたバトンを落とし、前世代の起業家の先輩たちを失望させたと感じたのです。
I met with David Packard and Bob Noyce and tried to apologize for screwing up so badly.
私はDavid Packard氏とBob Noyce氏に会い、このような事態になってしまったお詫びをしようとしました。
I was a very public failure, and I even thought about running away from the valley.
私は世の中に知れ渡った失敗者でしたので、(シリコン)バレーから去ろうとも考えました。
But something slowly began to dawn on me: I still loved what I did.
けれども、ゆっくりと私の中で何かが見えてきました。それは自分がしてきた仕事に対する愛情でした。
The turn of events at Apple had not changed that one bit.
アップル社で起こった出来事も、私の気持ちを変える事はできませんでした。
I had been rejected, but I was still in love. And so I decided to start over.
拒絶こそされましたが、私にはまだ愛が残っていたのです。そこで、また1から始めようと思ったのです。
I didn’t see it then, but it turned out that getting fired from Apple was the best thing that could have ever happened to me.
その当時はそう見えませんでしたが、アップル社に解雇されたことは、私にとって最高の出来事となったのです。
The heaviness of being successful was replaced by the lightness of being a beginner again, less sure about everything.
成功の重圧は、全てが不確かであるという初心者の軽さにとってかわりました。
It freed me to enter one of the most creative periods of my life.
人生の中で最も創造的な時期へと開放してくれたのです。
During the next five years, I started a company named NeXT, another company named Pixar, and fell in love with an amazing woman who would become my wife.
その後の5年間で、私はNeXTという会社、Pixarという別会社を立ち上げ、私の妻となるすばらしい女性と恋に落ちました。
Pixar went on to create the world’s first computer-animated feature film, Toy Story, and is now the most successful animation studio in the world.
Pixar社は、世界で初のコンピューターアニメーション映画『Toy story』という映画を製作し、現在では世界で最も成功したアニメーションスタジオとなっています。
In a remarkable turn of events, Apple bought NeXT, and I returned to Apple, and the technology we developed at NeXT is at the heart of Apple’s current renaissance.
思いがけないことに、アップル社はNeXtを買収し、私はアップル社へ戻ることになったのです。NeXTで開発したテクノロジーは、現在のアップル復興の核です。
And Laurene and I have a wonderful family together.
Laureneと私は結婚し、素晴らしい家庭を持ちました。
I’m pretty sure none of this would have happened if I hadn’t been fired from Apple.
これらのうちどれ1つとして、私がアップル社から解雇されなければ起こらなかったことです。
It was awful tasting medicine, but I guess the patient needed it.
苦い薬でしたが、患者にとって必要なものだったのです。
Sometime life – Sometimes life’s going to hit you in the head with a brick.
人生は時としてあなたに厳しい試練を与えてきます。
Don’t lose faith.
けれども信念を失ってはいけません。
I’m convinced that the only thing that kept me going was that I loved what I did.
自分がしてきたことを愛していたからこそ、私は歩き続けることができたのです。
You’ve got to find what you love.
あなたがたも自分が愛するものを見つけなければいけません。
And that is as true for work as it is for your lovers.
これは仕事についても恋愛についても言えることです。
Your work is going to fill a large part of your life, and the only way to be truly satisfied is to do what you believe is great work.
仕事はあなたの人生の大きなパートを占めると思いますが、満足するためには自分がすばらしいと思う仕事をすることです。
And the only way to do great work is to love what you do.
すばらしい仕事をするには、自分がしていることを愛することです。
If you haven’t found it yet, keep looking – and don’t settle.
もしまだ見つけていないというのであれば、探し続けてください。そして立ち止まらないように。
As with all matters of the heart, you’ll know when you find it.
全ての心の問題と同じように、見つけたときにはわかるはずです。
And like any great relationship, it just gets better and better as the years roll on.
すばらしい恋愛関係と同じように、それも年月をかさねるごとに、よりよくなっていきます。
So keep looking – don’t settle.
探し続けてください。決して探すことを止めないで下さい。
My third story is about death.
私の3つ目のお話は死についてです。
When I was 17, I read a quote that went something like: “If you live each day as if it was your last, someday you’ll most certainly be right.”
私が17歳のとき、このような格言を読みました。「もし君が、毎日を今日が最後の日だと思って生きていくのであれば、いつの日か君はひとかどの人間になるであろう。」
It made an impression on me, and since then, for the past 33 years, I’ve looked in the mirror every morning and asked myself: “If today were the last day of my life, would I want to do what I am about to do today?”
その言葉は私に強い印象を与えたのです。それからの33年間ずっと、私は毎朝鏡にむかい、自分自身を見つめながら問いかけます。(もし今日が、自分にとって最後の日であるなら、これから自分がやろうとしていることをするだろうか?)
And whenever the answer has been “No” for too many days in a row, I know I need to change something.
何日も続いて答えが「No」である場合、私は自分自身何か変えなければいけないという事がわかるのです。
Remembering that I’ll be dead soon is the most important tool I’ve ever encountered to help me make the big choices in life.
自分の死を身近に考えることが、人生の大きな決断をするのに、一番重要な助けとなります。
Because almost everything – all external expectations, all pride, all fear of embarrassment or failure – these things just fall away in the face of death, leaving only what is truly important.
なぜなら、ほとんど全てのこと…、外部の期待、プライド、恥ずかしい思いをすることや失敗への恐れ・・・これらのことは死に直面すればすべてなくなり、本当に大切なことだけが残ります。
Remembering that you are going to die is the best way I know to avoid the trap of thinking you have something to lose. You are already naked.
死に向かっていると思い出すことは、何かを失ってしまうのではないか思い悩むワナから抜け出すための、私が知っている最良の方法です。あなたは、すでに裸なのです。
There is no reason not to follow your heart.
心に従ってはいけない理由などありません。
About a year ago I was diagnosed with cancer.
1年ほど前に、私は癌と診断されました。
I had a scan at 7:30 in the morning, and it clearly showed a tumor on my pancreas.
朝の7:30から精密検査を受け、私の膵臓にはあきらかに腫瘍があることがわかったのです。
I didn’t even know what a pancreas was.
私は膵臓が何であるかさえ知りませんでした。
The doctors told me this was almost certainly a type of cancer that is incurable, and that I should expect to live no longer than three to six months.
医者は私に、これはほぼ治療不可能な癌であり、あと3~6ヶ月以上は生きられないと宣告しました。
My doctor advised me to go home and get my affairs in order, which is doctor’s code for “prepare to die.”
医者は、家に戻り仕事を片付けるようにいいましたが、これは医者が言うところの「死ぬ準備をしろ」という暗号なのです。
It means to try and tell your kids everything you thought you’d have the next 10 years to tell them in just a few months.
それはあなたの子供たちに、これからの10年間で教えるであろうことを、この数ヶ月で全て教えるよう努力しろという意味です。
It means to make sure everything is buttoned up so that it will be as easy as possible for your family.
それは全てを完結して仕上げ、家族に迷惑がかからないようにという意味です。
It means to say your goodbyes.
つまり、別れの挨拶をしろという意味です。
I lived with that diagnosis all day.
診断書と共に一日を過ごしました。
Later that evening I had a biopsy, where they stuck an endoscope down my throat, through my stomach into my intestines, put a needle into my pancreas and got a few cells from the tumor.
その後夕方遅くに私は生体検査を受けました。 内視鏡を喉、そして食道し、腸まで通し、膵臓に針を刺し、膵臓からいくつかの細胞を採取しました。
I was sedated, but my wife, who was there, told me that when they viewed the cells under a microscope the doctors started crying because it turned out to be a very rare form of pancreatic cancer that is curable with surgery.
私は冷静でした。しかしそこにいた妻によると、私の細胞を顕微鏡で観察した際、医師たちは泣き崩れたとか。なぜならそこに見えたものはすごく稀な形態の膵臓癌で、治療可能なものとわかったからでした。
I had the surgery and, thankfully, I’m fine now.
私は手術を受け、ありがたいことに、今は健康です。
This was the closest I’ve been to facing death, and I hope it’s the closest I get for a few more decades.
これが、私が死に最も近いところに直面した体験ですが、できればこのあと20、30年の中でこれが最後であって欲しいものです。
Having lived through it, I can now say this to you with a bit more certainty than when death was a useful but purely intellectual concept: No one wants to die.
この経験を通じて、死が有益だが単に知的概念にすぎなかった頃より、もう少し確信を持って今私があなた方に言えるのは、誰一人として死にたくはないということです。
Even people who want to go to heaven don’t want to die to get there.
天国に行きたい人ですら、死にたくはないでしょう。
And yet death is the destination we all share.
けれども、死というのは全ての人類に共通する目的地です。
No one has ever escaped it.
誰も逃れられない。
And that is as it should be, because Death is very likely the single best invention of Life.
だからこそ、そうあるべきなのです。なぜなら死というものは生命の唯一のすばらしい発明であるからです。
It’s Life’s change agent. It clears out the old to make way for the new.
これは生命交替の代理人であり、古いものが新しくなるための道です。
Right now the new is you, but someday not too long from now, you will gradually become the old and be cleared away.
今は新しいものはあなたがたです。けれどいつの日か、そう遠くない将来、あなたがたも古くなり、そして消えていきます。
Sorry to be so dramatic, but it’s quite true.
ドラマティックな言い方で申し訳ありませんが、これは真実なのです。
Your time is limited, so don’t waste it living someone else’s life.
あなたの時間は限られているのですから、他の誰かのために無駄にしないでください。他人の考えと共に生きていくという考え方にとらわれないでください。
Don’t be trapped by dogma – which is living with the results of other people’s thinking.
教義、つまり他人が考えた結果に従うことにとらわれてはいけません。
Don’t let the noise of others’ opinions drown out your own inner voice.
他の人の声の雑音であなたの内なる声が消えないようにしてください。
And most important, have the courage to follow your heart and intuition.
そしてもっとも重要なことは、自分自身の心や直感に従う勇気を持つことです。
They somehow already know what you truly want to become.
なぜかそれらはあなたが本当に望んでいる姿が既にわかっているのです。
Everything else is secondary.
それ以外の全てのことは2番目でいいのです。
When I was young, there was an amazing publication called The Whole Earth Catalog, which was one of the “bibles” of my generation.
私が若かりし頃、『全世界カタログ(The Whole Earth Catalog)』というすばらしい出版物があり、我々の世代にとっては一種のバイブルのひとつでもありました。
It was created by a fellow named Stewart Brand not far from here in Menlo Park, and he brought it to life with his poetic touch.
Stewart Brandという名前の男性によって、ここから遠くないMenlo Parkというところで制作されたもので、彼の詩的な要素が吹き込まれていました。
This was in the late 60s, before personal computers and desktop publishing, so it was all made with typewriters, scissors, and Polaroid cameras.
これは60年代後半の、まだコンピュータのない時代でしたので、全てのものがタイプライター、はさみ、ポラロイドカメラで作られていました。
It was sort of like Google in paperback form, 35 years before Google came along. It was idealistic, overflowing with neat tools and great notions.
言うなればGoogleが現れる35年前の、一種Googleの書籍版のような、理想的で、すごいツールとすばらしい概念にあふれたものだったのです。
Stewart and his team put out several issues of The Whole Earth Catalog, and then when it had run its course, they put out a final issue.
Stewartと彼のチームは全世界カタログをいくつか出版し、いきつくところまでいくと、ついに最終巻を出版しました。
It was the mid-1970s, and I was your age.
これは1970年代半ばのことで、私はあなたがたの年齢でした。
On the back cover of their final issue was a photograph of an early morning country road, the kind you might find yourself hitchhiking on if you were so adventurous.
最終巻の背表紙は、あなたが冒険好きならば、ヒッチハイクで出くわすかもしれないような田舎の早朝の写真でした。
Beneath it were the words: “Stay Hungry. Stay Foolish.”
そこには「ハングリーであれ、愚かであれ」というメッセージが書かれていました。
It was their farewell message as they signed off.
これは彼らのさよならのメッセージだったのです。Stay Hungry. Stay Foolish. 「ハングリーであれ、愚かであれ。」
And I’ve always wished that for myself.
私自身そうありたいと思っています。
And now, as you graduate to begin anew, I wish that for you.
今ここに卒業という日を迎えたあなたがたにも、こうあってほしいと望んでいます。
Stay Hungry. Stay Foolish.
つねにハングリー精神を持ち続け、そして固定観念にとらわれないでください。
Thank you all very much. 
ご清聴どうもありがとございました。
スピーチ引用元:http://news-service.stanford.edu/news/2005/june15/jobs-061505.html

この記事が気に入ったらSHARE

 

この記事が気に入ったら
いいね!しよう

最新情報をお届けします

LINEで送る
Pocket

コメントはこちら

shares